Creating Learning People Through Play

Creating Learning People Through Play

As the philosopher Eric Hoffer once said, “The central task of education is to implant a will and facility for learning.  It should produce not learned but learning people.”  That statement is very similar to what I call “the rule of the slide rule.”

Back in the olden days, when a scientist, engineer, or mathematician had to calculate really big numbers – such as 946,789 times 302,517 – he took out his slide rule.  It was like three rulers stuck together with the middle one going back and forth.  Then there was a piece with a line on it.  It was based on logarithms or something.  All I know is they wouldn’t let me graduate from college until I passed the slide rule test.  After months of arduous and unpleasant instruction, I finally was able to barely pass the test and they allowed me to graduate.  I swear it was less than a month later that the first calculators came out.  Now the only time you see a slide rule it’s in the Smithsonian Museum.  And I can’t remember the names of all my grandchildren because I have all this slide rule stuff clogging up my head doing me no good whatsoever.

That is why in this day and age of rapidly advancing technology it is so critically important to enroll your child in a play-based early education program like Romp n’ Roll.  A program that focuses on mastery of specific information and skills is far less likely to prepare a child for success than one that is designed to instill a love of learning and the ability to learn anything specific quickly and easily in the future.

Categories: